101 Tips to Living in Taiwan: Our Free eBook, Released!

We’re proud to announce the release of our first eBook!    101 Tips to Living in Taiwan is an easy-to-digest guide that teaches the ins and outs of living in Taiwan. 101 Tips to Living in Taiwan will streamline your transition to living in a new and foreign country while inspiring you to get out and explore all that it has to offer. You’ll have more confidence, less stress, and the knowledge you need to make the most out of your time in Taiwan.   How This Book Will Help You   * Get 101 of our best tips for living and traveling in Taiwan  How to save money and take Chinese lessons for free (Tip 34) Where to see a 14-meter wooden ship ceremoniously set ablaze (Tip 80) What it really means when Taiwanese say, “Well maybe you could…” (Tip 50) …and much, much more! *Additional ‘Fast Facts’ throughout the book make everyday life easier-and more fun!   *Over 40 high-quality photographs give you snapshots of what life in Taiwan really looks like!   Why Trust Us? Before arriving in Taiwan we knew next to nothing about what to expect. It took us two years of exploring and a lot of deliberate effort, but we finally learned the ins and outs of expat life in Taiwan. Additionally, we’ve been blogging and answering readers’ questions about Taiwan for two years. We know what you want, and need, to know about living and traveling in Taiwan. This is a compilation of those things.   We believe in this resource so much that we are offering it for free. We truly want you to benefit from...

8 Things We Don’t Miss About Taiwan

Last week we shared what we miss most from our lives in Taiwan. Now it’s time to divulge a few of the things we don’t miss so much. No matter where you call home, there are going to be both pros and cons to the location. If you’re one of our dear Taiwanese friends reading this, please remember we love you, and the pros to our life in Taiwan far outweighed any of the things that bothered us. Although we wanted to keep the lists balanced, we could only come up with 8 things we won’t miss. See? Told you we loved more than we didn’t.   8 Things We Don’t Miss About Living In Taiwan   1. The Umbrellas The average height of an Asian female is 5 foot 2 inches. Dan is a comfortable 5 foot 9 inches —just the right height for people walking around crowded areas with umbrellas to stab him in the face. This happened more often than you might think: Taiwanese women prefer white skin, so they often choose to shield themselves from the harsh rays of the sun with their handy- dandy umbrella! So no, Dan won’t miss the jabbing.   2. The Nervous Giggles   ‘Wai Goa Ren’ means ‘white person’, but it is not an offensive term. If you are light-skinned, you’ll likely hear the name called out when you enter an establishment where no one feels comfortable conversing with you in English. If Taiwanese girls are present, they will probably get flustered, which in turn will become an uncontrollable spell of giggles. We got really tired of this, especially...

10 Things We Miss About Living In Taiwan

The other day we started feeling awfully nostalgic about the two years we spent living in Taiwan. Leaving was a whirlwind. In between packing up our apartment, saying goodbye to the most adorable 6 year olds in the world (that I taught almost the entire two years!), writing our first eBook, and planning our cycling trip through Vietnam, there wasn’t a whole lot of time left to process our farewell.   That said, one of the good parts about spending eight hours a day on a bike is that it allows for plenty of time for reflection. When we weren’t thinking about how uncomfortable we were or what we wanted to gorge on for supper that night, we did inevitably find time to think about leaving Taiwan. And while we aren’t ready to return yet, we quickly realized there is already plenty we miss.   In no particular order, the 10 things we miss most about life in Taiwan:   1. Driving A Scooter/Motorcycle   I was petrified to drive a scooter. I actually managed to resist it for a whole six months while my loving husband chauffeured me around town. But then our work schedules changed and there was just no denying it. I was going to have to face my fears and learn to drive in Taiwanese traffic. I hated it for the first few weeks. It was stressful and scary and I was convinced I was going to get into an accident that would leave me even more terrified of driving. But then something miraculous happened. As I became more comfortable with the flow of scooters...
Sunday Snapshot | Journey to the Ancient Trees | Hsinchu County, Taiwan

Sunday Snapshot | Journey to the Ancient Trees | Hsinchu County, Taiwan

  There are so many things about Taiwan we’ll remember. The magnificent scenery is surely one of them. I took this photo of Casey as we hiked in search of the Giant Biedelaman Trees. While we aren’t sure if we ever did stumble upon the towering beasts, the journey was reward enough in itself. Thank you Taiwan for always inspiring us, surprising us, pushing us. We hope to one day meet again.  ...

Why You Should Teach ESL Abroad (& How To Do It) – Part 1

 This is the first of a two-part series on teaching English abroad. Stay tuned—we’ll talk more about how you can get started teaching ESL in part 2!   “Do you think I can teach ESL abroad?” This is without a doubt the most common question we receive from our readers. When we set out to answer such an open question, we consistently wish we could refer back to an article or two on our site as an additional resource.  But unfortunately we can’t, as we have yet to write about teaching ESL abroad—despite the fact that we have been teaching ESL, full time, for two years now. Well, better late than never. If you’ve ever thought about traveling, teaching, or Taiwan, than this post (finally) is for you!     Why You Should Teach ESL Abroad (& How To Do It) – Part 1 The Benefits of Teaching ESL Abroad   Travel:   Dan and I knew we wanted to start off our marriage by traveling the world together. Our belief was that it would be much more difficult to set out on a nomadic adventure if we first settled down and accumulated ‘stuff’; alternatively, we chose to relocate to Asia immediately after our honeymoon—and we’re so glad we did! To make traveling sustainable, we knew we would need an income overseas. After all, we had just graduated University! The first option that opened up for us—as it does most travelers—was teaching English. It worked out perfectly. One of the best parts about teaching English overseas is that it generally requires you to settle down in one location for...

16 Cute Puppies From Taiwan

Guys. It’s finally happening! Our FREE eBook, 101 Tips to Living in Taiwan, is coming out this week! We’ve spent the past couple months compiling our top 101 tips for expats and travelers in Taiwan, and we’ve got to say that we are pumped out of our minds to at long last share our inside knowledge with you. It’s been a lot of work and countless hours, but it’s finally paying off. Needless to say, we truly believe in the quality of this free resource, available in the next few days! Sign up to automatically receive 101 Tips to Living in Taiwan delivered straight to your email upon its release!   UPDATE: THE EBOOK IS NOW AVAILABLE! CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR COPY NOW!   In the meantime, we thought we would help with those Monday blues by sharing our cutest Taiwan puppy pictures. If this doesn’t cheer you up—or at least make you awww a few times—we don’t know what will. We’ve already talked about the Taiwanese ‘cute factor’. As you might expect, it follows that Taiwanese adore their small, fluffy canines. They dress them up. They die their hair. They take them into restaurants and on trains and in department stores. Even I have to admit, it doesn’t get much cuter than these 16 cute puppies from Taiwan. Hope these furry bundles of joy bring a smile to your face!   It’s worth noting that larger dogs are not nearly as fondled; as such, Taiwan currently has a massive stray dog problem. It’s common to buy dogs as pups, only to put them out on the streets...