How to Become an English Teacher Abroad

  Have you just graduated from college and want to explore the world while getting paid handsomely for it? Why not consider becoming an English teacher overseas! There are thousands and thousands of opportunities in countries like Turkey, Argentina, Morocco, China, Spain or Indonesia, and that’s just the beginning of the list. In fact, almost any skilled and fluent English speaker can follow this path if they put their mind to it. But how do you do that? Read on to learn more:   Where do I begin? Since you already have a college degree (and most teaching job opportunities will require it), the next thing you need to do is get the extra certification required for your target country. You can either move to that country and get certified there or do it before the journey to the place of your choosing. There are hundreds of sites and blogs to help you with this information. And while at it, beware of online fraudsters – you’ll need a little bit of research, but only go for reputable websites with genuine user reviews. Also, while planning the trip itself, don’t remember about Discountrue coupons for Expedia or Hotels.com, as they can help you save immensely on the flight ticket and other travel expenses. You don’t want to start your new life penniless, do you?   What kind of certification is required? For most English language teaching destinations, you will typically need a TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) or TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) certification. You can opt for an online course or register for an in-class...

Why You Should Teach ESL Abroad (& How To Do It) – Part 2

This is a two-part series about teaching ESL abroad. In case you missed it, read part 1 here. Last week we talked about why you should (or perhaps shouldn’t) teach English abroad. This week we’re going to focus more on the details: where to go, how to do it, and what it looks like. The Destination Perhaps the most daunting part of teaching ESL abroad is choosing where to go. With options virtually everywhere, you must decide what it is you want out of your teaching experience.  We have only taught in Taiwan and Italy, so we are by no means experts in teaching programs around the world. However, we have picked up a bit here and there from fellow travelers, bloggers, and our own job hunting. This is what we’ve learned: If money is a consideration, than you are likely looking at China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, potentially Thailand, and the Middle East. These countries provide the highest salary with competitive benefits, and have a low cost of living. Other destinations in Southeast Asia and Latin America tend to be extremely popular, but not as lucrative—they might not even pay anything at all! Volunteer ESL teaching can be just as—if not more—rewarding; however, exercise caution before paying extortionate fees to volunteer recruiting agencies. Often this money is going to a select few at the top of the chain, not back to the community. A few European countries also offer teaching programs and opportunities, such as Spain, the Czech Republic, Turkey and Russia. Unless you are going through a government-sponsored program, non-European Union citizens will likely have difficulty securing...

Why You Should Teach ESL Abroad (& How To Do It) – Part 1

 This is the first of a two-part series on teaching English abroad. Stay tuned—we’ll talk more about how you can get started teaching ESL in part 2!   “Do you think I can teach ESL abroad?” This is without a doubt the most common question we receive from our readers. When we set out to answer such an open question, we consistently wish we could refer back to an article or two on our site as an additional resource.  But unfortunately we can’t, as we have yet to write about teaching ESL abroad—despite the fact that we have been teaching ESL, full time, for two years now. Well, better late than never. If you’ve ever thought about traveling, teaching, or Taiwan, than this post (finally) is for you!     Why You Should Teach ESL Abroad (& How To Do It) – Part 1 The Benefits of Teaching ESL Abroad   Travel:   Dan and I knew we wanted to start off our marriage by traveling the world together. Our belief was that it would be much more difficult to set out on a nomadic adventure if we first settled down and accumulated ‘stuff’; alternatively, we chose to relocate to Asia immediately after our honeymoon—and we’re so glad we did! To make traveling sustainable, we knew we would need an income overseas. After all, we had just graduated University! The first option that opened up for us—as it does most travelers—was teaching English. It worked out perfectly. One of the best parts about teaching English overseas is that it generally requires you to settle down in one location for...

This Is Why We Travel

Last week we posted about our own life changes we’re making. This week we are following the theme with an inspiring guest post from Goats On The Road. Turns out we aren’t the only crazy folks out there passionate about indefinite travel!  Enjoy!   When I now think back on all of the years I spent sitting at my comfortable desk, at my comfortable job in the legal profession, enjoying the comforts of my day-to-day life, I can’t help but think “wow, I was missing out on some great travel years!” Back then, something was definitely missing. Life was becoming too comfortable. When Nick and I started dating, we had great jobs, a mortgage, a car and lots of material things, which is what most people strive for, but for us, we weren’t satisfied. We knew we wanted to leave the mundane 9-5 rat race, put our regular routines on the back-burner and set off on an eye-opening and life changing adventure. Many questions arose from many people: “How can you just drop everything and travel?” “Don’t you need lots of money?” “What about your house?” This may sound cliché, but if you want something bad enough, everything will fall into place and it’ll just work out. It’s actually quite easy to drop everything and make a life-changing decision, but what you have to make sure of first is that you really want it. We both knew it’s what we wanted and we started putting the plans in motion. We saved money for a year and had ourselves on an at-home budget. No needless spending, no going out to...

Get it Straight: Fact and Fiction of Taiwan

We’ve been living in Taiwan for nearly two years now. And in that time, we’ve started to notice some trends in terms of what people assume Taiwan is like. Sometimes people are spot on. Other times, they’re just a little bit off the map. Literally. So we’ve decided to clear the air once and for all, banishing a few misconceptions while also reaffirming a few of the stereotypes. While we felt we could have added a few more things to the list, we tried to rely most heavily on the presumptions we hear from people who haven’t yet made it to Taiwan. Accordingly, here you are—facts and fiction about life in Taiwan.   Let’s start with The Misconceptions: 1.    Taiwan is not Thailand You would think this would be a bit obvious. But I guess it’s not. We’ve actually lost count of how many times we’ve had the following conversation: Random person we just met: Where do you live? Oh cool! That must be so much fun. I just love Thai food. Do you eat it, like, all the time? Dan or I trying to be polite: Um…yea…there are a couple of Thai restaurants. They’re pretty good. But we try to eat more local Taiwanese food… Random person we just met: Wait, where do you live? Not Thailand? Oh, Taiwan. Where is Taiwan again? “I love Thai food” is literally the number one statement we get after we tell people we live in Taiwan. Not to judge, because the number one Google search for Taiwan is ‘Where is Taiwan?’, so I guess there are a lot of confused souls...