Sunday Snapshot  | Sun Moon Lake | Nantou, Taiwan

Sunday Snapshot | Sun Moon Lake | Nantou, Taiwan

This is one of the first shots we took during our trip to Sun Moon Lake. We were inspired by this little boy’s excitement at watching the waves–something we most certainly would have taken for granted. Although we have seen plenty of lakes in our lifetime, we were quite taken back by the beauty of Sun Moon Lake, primarily for the idyllic contrast of expansive blue water and misty green mountains. Want to see your picture featured on our Photo Friday segment? We’re now accepting guest submissions! Just send us an email at acruisingcouple@gmail.com with your photo and a brief description. We’d love to have...
Taiwanese Hot Springs: The Ultimate Guide to Taiwan’s Hottest Attraction

Taiwanese Hot Springs: The Ultimate Guide to Taiwan’s Hottest Attraction

I’m not really a huge fan of hot springs. I mean, I like them enough. They’re relaxing and rejuvenating and don’t require any physical exertion. It’s mostly that I can’t manage to stay in them longer than five minutes because of the sweat that begins to pour down my face. That being said, Dan and I just got back from a hot spring hotel in Central Taiwan, and I loved it. It probably helped that we had a private hot spring bath in our room that overlooked the adjacent valley and mountains. And I must admit, even if I don’t normally get excited about hot springs, I always feel amazing afterwards. In Asia, hot springs are believed to raise energy levels while possibly treating chronic fatigue, eczema and arthritis—a pretty good reason to give the popular Taiwanese pastime a go.     There are two main things to remember before visiting Taiwan’s hot springs:   1)    If hot spring baths are separated by gender, you’re expected to bathe nude. I was bit worried it would be totally awkward sporting by birthday suit with a bunch of old Taiwanese women, but it’s not actually that bad. Plus, these “nude” hot springs are typically a bit nicer, with various showerheads, more variety in water temperature, steam rooms, and no obnoxious children splashing sulfur water in your face. 2)    You must wear a shower cap before entering the hot springs. Sometimes these will be provided, other times you are expected to bring your own. Beyond that, just follow common sense. Don’t bathe if you have any health risks, don’t stay in the hot...