4 Must-Visit Destinations On Your Next Trip To Colombia

4 Must-Visit Destinations On Your Next Trip To Colombia

This post was last updated on January 30th, 2017Planning an adventure to Colombia? Chances are Medellin, Cartagena, and Bogotá are high on your bucket-list. But there’s much more to Colombia than its cities alone. Next time you’re headed to the country, check out a few of these great side trips. From colonial villages to serene natural escapes, you’ll leave Colombia with a better understanding of the vibrant, mesmerizing country:     4 Must-Visit Destinations On Your Next Trip To Colombia     1) Villa De Leyva, Boyaca: Colonial Village and Historic Adventures   Villa de Leyva (about a three-hour car drive from Bogota.)  A hidden gem for those outside of Colombia, this town has a history that will take you back in time as if you were in a real-life museum. Villa De Leyva was founded in 1572 by Spanish colonizers and became a major producer of wheat, barley, and oil. After the war for independence, Villa De Leyva gained a little fame as the hometown of war-hero, Captain Antonio Ricaurte. Finally, by 1954, Villa de Leyva officially became a National Monument.   Recently, Villa De Leyva has been attracting more and more travelers. This small town has begun to add new restaurants (perfect for taking in the stunning scenery while dining), hotels where you can enjoy the calm atmosphere of the town, and tourist shops (great for finding local nicknacks to bring back to your loved ones.) Furthermore, when “Zorro,” a popular soap opera, was filmed here, it infused this historically rich town with a flare of entertainment. Now more visitors than ever before can be found enjoying this...
Inside Colombia’s Astonishing Zipaquira Salt Cathedral

Inside Colombia’s Astonishing Zipaquira Salt Cathedral

This post was last updated on September 5th, 2017 In the depths of the Zipaquira mountain, nearly 200 meters underground, lies an astonishing attraction: a fully-functioning Catholic Cathedral carved out of the salt deposits of an abandoned mine. When we discovered the Salt Cathedral is one of only two in the world, we knew we had to hop on the bus for the one-hour journey from Bogota. And we’re so glad we did. The Zipaquira Salt Cathedral proved to be a hauntingly beautiful experience and a highlight of our time in Colombia.     The Astonishing Zipaquirá Salt Cathedral Outside Bogota, Colombia   First, a short history of the salt mines. The indigenous Muisca people were the first to benefit from the salt deposits in the region; the resource transformed the group into one of the most prosperous pre-Hispanic societies of their time. Many years later, the mines were used to finance the campaigns of the liberators Nariño and Bolívar, who brought independence to Colombia 200 years ago.     The salt deposit continued to serve as a valuable mine for hundreds of years. But however prosperous, salt mining is also extremely dangerous. The miners had long dedicated a special place in the mines for their daily prayers of safety. In the 1950s, the salt miners took it a step further and began to carve their first cathedral into the mine, dedicating it to Our Lady of Rosary, Patron saint of miners. Unfortunately, the underground church was constructed too close to the surface and was closed due to structural concerns. The miners went back to work, this time with the support...
The Quick and Dirty Guide to Visiting Medellin, Colombia

The Quick and Dirty Guide to Visiting Medellin, Colombia

This post was last updated on September 5th, 2017  It wasn’t all that long ago that Medellin was considered one of the most dangerous places in the world; being the notorious hideout of Pablo Escobar, an infamous Colombian drug lord and cocaine trafficker, it’s hardly any wonder why. But today there is a tangible feeling of hope that pervades the city. Paisas (people from Medellin) are extremely proud of their home—even if it does still have its flaws—and more and more travelers and expats are finding themselves extending their stay in the red brick metropolitan valley.     Despite our unfortunate incident in Bogota on our last day in the country, Colombia remains to be one of our favorite places in the world. And of the few places we visited in the country, Medellin was without a doubt our favorite. Paisas are kind, funny, warm and hospitable, and though we only spent about two and a half weeks in the city, we formed many wonderful relationships we’ll remember for much longer.     You can see all of Medellin’s tourist attractions in just a couple of days, but we highly recommend prolonging your visit to have more time to sample the food, meet the people, and allow the City of Eternal Spring to fully win your heart.   What To Do In Medellin, Colombia   Go For A Ride On The Metrocable     If you do one thing in Medellin, make it riding the metrocable up to the Biblioteca Espana. A ticket on the metro system takes you to any stop, including the top of the cable car,...