Chasing Blue Flames and Surviving Sulfur Clouds–Mt. Ijen

I never thought I would find myself hiking to the center of an active volcano at 2am in the morning, fighting off clouds of suffocating volcanic gasses, all for the sake of seeing some ‘magical’ blue flames. But there I was, doing exactly that. With a tour guide, five Europeans, and a couple of headlamps, we set out at 1am to climb Mt. Ijen, a volcano in the eastern part of Java. We sort-of knew what we were getting ourselves into, having previously researched climbable volcanoes and such. However, we were definitely in no way prepared for the actual situation. It’s not that Ijen is a hard trek. Climbing up is a bit steep and descending in a bit challenging, but it’s nothing like a 15-minute Amanda Russell workout. (Her free YouTube videos seriously kill me.)

Mount Ijen View, Java A Cruising Couple

What’s the difficulty then? Those suffocating clouds I mentioned. From an active vent in the volcano, gasses billow out. And when the wind blows, these dense fumes head straight for your lungs, leaving you coughing and anxious to find cover. At least this was the case for us. I think we might have been there during an especially windy day though after talking to fellow travelers who had previously tackled Ijen without the same experience. Regardless, it’s not something to be taken lightly.

Inside Ijen

The purpose of subjecting ourselves to such conditions was to see the legendary blue flames. At night, jets of sulfur gas burst out of the volcano, burning a fiery blue. It’s only visible at night, and only in certain parts of the volcano. Unfortunately, the conditions weren’t really ideal for taking photos, so our pictures don’t quite show the magnitude or beauty of the blue flames.  

Blue Flame, Ijen

While the blue flames were pretty cool, they’re not what make Mt. Ijen so remarkable; rather, it’s the sulfur miners who work inside of it everyday.

 Miner, Ijen

Job description: hike into an active volcano, breath toxic gasses, extract sulfur deposits, and carry 150lbs of it on your shoulders back out of the volcano for barely enough money to get by. Who’s ready to sign up?

 Extraction, Ijen

More specifically, the gasses inside the volcano are channeled through pipes that then produce sulfur deposits. The miners’ job is to break off this sulfur and carry backbreaking loads of it on their shoulders to a nearby refinery. And they do it for less than $15 a day. It is absolutely unbelievable the conditions that these miners work in day in and day out. After a mere hour, our entire trekking group was ready to leave the treacherous conditions of Ijen. Unfortunately, this isn’t really a choice for the miners that depend upon it for their livelihood. What’s more, during our brief time at Ijen we only saw one miner wearing a respirator. Only one.

Load of Sulfur, Ijen

After hiking Mt. Ijen, Dan and I had differing opinions on the experience. Dan thought it was cool, but not something he would necessarily recommend, in large part due to the gasses. I found it to be strangely beautiful, watching the dancing blue flames framed by smoke with a sky full of sparkling stars above. I felt as though we had descended into another world. However, we both agreed that if you decide to enter Mt. Ijen, do it at night. The experience is not nearly the same in the middle of the day, and you miss out on the beautiful sunrise that paints the sky behind the surrounding volcanoes.

Fog, Ijen

Sunrise from Ijen

In the Air from Ijen

There are plenty of tour groups that will take you to Mt. Bromo and Mt. Ijen. These tours can be organized from Yogyakarta or Bali, just be sure to clarify if Ijen is a day or night hike.

Have you ever hiked a volcano? What’s the most memorable hike you have been on?

 

More from Indonesia:

The Ancient Complexes of                                   Batik, Puppets, Jackfruit and 
Borobudur and Prambanan                                 Sultans in Jogja

Getting out of Kuta                                               10 Things to Love about Bali

Ubud, Bali: More Than Just                                 Gili Islands: A Guide to the
Eat, Pray, Love                                                      Magical Stepping Stones to Lombok

Padangbai Barong Dance:
An Exorcism Ceremony

Meet: Casey Siemasko


Casey Siemasko is a blogger, content marketer, and co-founder of A Cruising Couple. She has been living and traveling outside of the US full-time since 2011. She finds her life inspiration in exploring the world and seeks to find the magic in the most ordinary of places.

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5 Comments

  1. Hiked Ijen last summer too. One of the best experiences in my life! I was a bit of windy and cold day, so there weren’t much of sulfur fumes till we reached the lake in the crater. That’s where it’s impossible to breathe!

    And I’m so amazed by the guys working there too! It took me an eternity to get through all that twisting and rocky passes and those guys were rushing around with baskets weighing a dozen kilos at least. But, as I’ve been told by the locals, now they are actually making more money from tourists than from getting sulfur actually…
    Elena’s Travelgram recently posted…Making friends at Monkey Forest in UbudMy Profile

    Reply
    • Aren’t they just incredible? I don’t know how they do it, but I can definitely believe that they make more money from tourists. Glad you enjoyed the experience! It is definitely a once-in-a-lifetime kind of opportunity!

      Reply
  2. Hi!

    Could you tell me the name of your tour and the price?

    I am trying to plan our trip from Yogyakarta to Ijen but it’s not very easy :(

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hey there Isil! We actually booked our tour when we arrived in Yogyakarta. There are tons of options once you arrive in town and you shouldn’t have any problem booking a tour for the next day. I honestly can’t remember how much we payed but prices seem to be pretty standard. There are little tourist huts in the hotel/hostel areas you can inquire about prices. Hope that helps! If you have any other questions please don’t hesitate to ask :-)

      Reply
  3. The workers are incredible! i didn’t realise they earned so little until i got home and did some research about them. had i known, i would’ve given them a huge tip!!
    Audrey recently posted…Ich liebe BerlinMy Profile

    Reply

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